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by Joyia Emard

DCA Waiver Update

Today, the director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) issued the following waiver extensions:

Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-39-20, during the State of Emergency, the Director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs may waive any statutory or regulatory requirements with respect to a professional license issued pursuant to Division 2 of the Business and Professions Code.

To date, DCA Director Kimberly Kirchmeyer has issued 179 waivers. To view the waivers and guidance documents, or to sign up for notification of waivers as they are issued, visit dca.ca.gov/covid19.

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An air-conditioning contractor wearing safety gear installs a new unit on top of a high-rise roof.
Don’t skimp on quality and safety; follow key consumer advice from the Contractors State License Board

It’s a summertime nightmare: Extreme heat hits the scene just as your air conditioner gives up the ghost. You need an AC replacement ASAP, but in your quest for speedy relief, don’t sacrifice quality and safety—follow these 10 tips from the Contractors State License Board (CSLB) to make sure your new unit is installed properly:

  1. An air-conditioning contractor opens the side of an AC unit.Check the license—Hire a state-licensed contractor and verify that the contractor is in good standing at https://search.dca.ca.gov or by calling (800) 321-CSLB (2752).
  2. Obtain a permit—Make sure your contractor obtains a building permit from your local building department. Beware of any contractor who offers a lower price to install a unit without a permit; having a permit ensures work will be inspected.
  3. Three-day right to cancel—Be sure your contract includes a three-day right-to-cancel clause. One major exception to the three-day right to cancel is a “Service and Repair” contract that covers emergency repairs or services that are requested by the consumer on short notice. (More information about home improvement contracts can be found in the “Consumers” section of CSLB’s website.) Seniors (those 65 and older) have five days to cancel home solicitation contracts, home improvement contracts, Property Assessed Clean Energy assessment contracts, service and repair contracts, and more.
  4. Insurance—Verify that your contractor has workers’ compensation and general liability insurance, which can be verified at www.cslb.ca.gov or by calling (800) 321-CSLB (2752). Homeowners may be financially liable for the cost of medical care for workers who are injured on their property.
  5. Written contract—Insist on a written, fix-priced contract and don’t sign anything until you completely understand the terms.
  6. Down payment—Don’t pay more than 10% down or $1,000, whichever is less.
  7. Payment schedule—Don’t make payments ahead of the work. Make progress payments as the work is completed to your satisfaction. Keep a record of all payments.
  8. Permit inspections—Make sure that your local building department performs all required inspections, including in-progress and final inspections, and that there are not any correction notices or red tags. Inspections ensure proper installation.
  9. Final payment—Don’t make final payment before the final inspection has been conducted, the permit completed by the building department, and you are satisfied with the work.
  10. Documentation—Keep a file of all documents and photos related to your project.

For more information on heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system installations, or for general assistance on other major home-improvement and contracting projects and the licensed professionals who do them, check out CSLB’s HVAC fact sheets or visit www.cslb.ca.gov.

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DCA Waiver Update

Today, the director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) issued sixteen waiver extensions:

Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-39-20, during the State of Emergency, the Director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs may waive any statutory or regulatory requirements with respect to a professional license issued pursuant to Division 2 of the Business and Professions Code.

To date, DCA Director Kimberly Kirchmeyer has issued 173 waivers. To view the waivers and guidance documents, or to sign up for notification of waivers as they are issued, visit dca.ca.gov/covid19.

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California Department of Consumer Affairs Waiver Update

Today, the director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) issued two new waivers and four waiver extensions today.

Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-39-20, during the State of Emergency, the Director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs may waive any statutory or regulatory requirements with respect to a professional license issued pursuant to Division 2 of the Business and Professions Code.

To date, DCA Director Kimberly Kirchmeyer has issued 157 waivers, including waivers to increase the state’s healthcare workforce, augment the number of COVID-19 vaccine administrators, expand access to COVID-19 testing and more.

To view the waivers and guidance documents, or to sign up for notification of waivers as they are issued, visit dca.ca.gov/covid19.

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VIDEO: The California Board of Barbering and Cosmetology (BBC) is celebrating its 8th Annual #SafeSandalSeason by providing consumers with an all-new pedicure safety video. With the weather warming up, you may be pulling out your sandals and getting ready to get your toenails done. But before you head over to the salon, make sure you are informed about pedicure safety.

For more information about BBC’s Safe Sandal Season, visit the Safe Sandal Season page at BBC’s website.

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California State Seal

$116.5 million vaccine incentive program – the biggest in the nation – to boost vaccinations as California prepares to fully reopen the economy June 15

$100 million in $50 prepaid or grocery cards for the next two million newly vaccinated people; $16.5 million in cash prizes for all vaccinated Californians

 

Editor’s note: this news release was distributed by the Office of Governor Gavin Newsom. Click here to view a printer-friendly version of this news release on the Governor’s website.

SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today launched Vax for the Win,” a new multi-faceted vaccine incentive program designed to motivate Californians to get their vaccination leading up to the state’s reopening on June 15. The incentives aim to give an extra nudge to those who still need to get vaccinated against COVID-19, especially those in hard-to-reach communities, while also thanking everyone who has already been vaccinated.

“Getting every eligible Californian vaccinated is how we bring our state roaring back from this pandemic,” said Governor Newsom. “California has already made incredible progress in the fight against COVID-19, with the lowest case rates in the country, while administering millions more vaccines than any other state. But we aren’t stopping there, we’re doing everything it takes to get Californians vaccinated as we approach June 15 to help us fully reopen safely.”

More than 62.8 percent of Californians aged 12+ are at least partially vaccinated, but an estimated 12 million people who are eligible still have not gotten a vaccine to protect their health and the well-being of their communities.

“Some Californians weren’t ready to get their COVID-19 vaccine on day one, and that’s okay. This program is designed to encourage those who need extra support to get vaccinated and help keep California safe,” said Dr. Tomás J. Aragón, California Department of Public Health Director and State Public Health Officer. “The State will work closely with our partners at local health departments and community-based organizations to ensure the program reaches families living in communities with the lowest vaccination rates, who might face language barriers and other obstacles.”

All Californians aged 12+ who are at least partially vaccinated are automatically eligible for the cash prize drawings taking place in June. Thirty winners in total will be selected for the “$50,000 Fridays” cash prize drawings on June 4 and June 11, totaling $1.5 million. On June 15, $1.5 million will be awarded to 10 lucky Californians – for a grand total of $15 million in cash prizes. Winners must complete their vaccination in order to claim their prize. If someone under 18 wins, the cash will be put in a savings account for them until they turn 18.

Beginning on May 27, the next two million people who begin and complete their COVID-19 vaccination will automatically be eligible to receive a $50 prepaid or grocery card, worth a total of $100 million. It gives them the option to select from a $50 Virtual Prepaid Card (which can be spent online, in-store where major debit cards are accepted, or added to a mobile wallet to be used to shop in stores that accept mobile wallets), or a $50 grocery gift card from Kroger (which includes Ralphs, Food 4 Less and Foods Co.) or Albertsons (which includes Safeway, Albertsons, Vons, Pavilions and Andronico’s Community Markets), while supplies last. Californians will receive a text message with an electronic prepaid card redemption code sent to their mobile phone or email address 7-10 days after their two-dose series of Pfizer or Moderna, or single dose of Johnson and Johnson. An incentive card will be held for those who start their vaccination at the launch of the program. Those who do not have a mobile phone or email address can receive a physical card by calling 1-833-993-3873, 7-10 days after receiving their final dose. Those without a permanent address can also call to coordinate delivery.

For more information, visit COVID19.ca.gov/vax-for-the-win. To schedule an appointment to be vaccinated, visit MyTurn.ca.gov or call the CA COVID-19 Hotline at 1-833-422-4255.

 

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A look back at a life-changing experience for this Northern California man who survived COVID-19 last year. Paul Cantelli shares his story and reflects on recovering from COVID-19 with the support of health care professionals. Many licensees under the California Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) played a role in his recovery. Watch as Paul Cantelli tells his story.

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BPPE Logo

On May 24, 2021, The Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) Director Kimberly Kirchmeyer appointed Melanie Delgado to the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE) Advisory Committee. Delgado will serve on the committee in the consumer advocate role, which is designated by statute.

We are excited to welcome Melanie Delgado as the newest member of the BPPE Advisory Committee,” said Director Kirchmeyer. “Consumer protection is the top priority for BPPE and the consumer advocate role is instrumental in representing student voices. Delgado’s experience and skills in advocacy are well-suited to further California’s consumer protection efforts.”

Delgado currently serves as senior staff attorney and director of Transition Age Youth Projects at the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law. Since 2006, she has conducted research, writing, and engaged in state and federal policy advocacy in the areas of transition age youth, foster youth, homeless youth, and commercially sexually exploited children. Delgado earned her law and bachelor of arts degrees from the University of San Diego.

The Advisory Committee examines the oversight functions and operational policies of the Bureau and advises with respect to matters relating to private postsecondary education. The committee also makes recommendations with respect to policies, practices, and regulations relating to private postsecondary education, and provides assistance as may be requested by the Bureau.

To learn more about BPPE, visit www.bppe.ca.gov.

To view a printer-friendly version of this news release, click here.

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Concerned about creepy-crawlies? Contact a licensed pest professional
A periodical cicada sits on a leaf.

Periodical cicadas like this one are part of the Brood X horde.

It sounds like something straight from a sci-fi movie poster: “Brood X Is Coming: Billions of Cicadas Set to Swarm.” But while the East Coast, South, and Midwest have cause for concern, California is in the clear from this bug-eyed insect horde.

Made up of a combination of cicada species—Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula—Brood X gets its alarming-sounding name from the Roman numeral for “10.” This particular insect group, also known as the less-scary “Great Eastern Brood,” is number 10 of more than a dozen broods of periodical cicadas to emerge every 17 years or so in the United States, primarily east of the Mississippi River.

These periodical cicadas spend almost all of their lives underground in a wingless larval form, feeding on sap from tree roots. What is known is that they emerge when the soil temperature reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit, but why they only emerge in unison every 17 years remains a major mystery. Once the periodical cicadas emerge, they molt and reach their winged form, mate, then lay their eggs in tree branches. The eggs then hatch after a few weeks, and the larvae drop to the ground and burrow to the roots, beginning the cycle again.

While periodical cicadas damage tree branches when laying their eggs and their molted husks drift across neighborhoods like unseasonable autumn leaves, they are most known for the males’ loud mating calls, which can reach a jackhammer-loud 100 decibels. Nevertheless, although they are noisy, periodical cicadas are definitely not destructive to homes or the environment.

A cicada rests on a large branch.

A California desert cicada rests on a tree branch.

In contrast to this periodical-cicada drama, California cicadas embrace our state’s chill, laid-back lifestyle. While California has more than 60 native cicada species, they emerge fuss-free every spring to molt and make much quieter rasping or clicking mating calls than Brood X types. But just like their Eastern cousins, California cicadas aren’t destructive creatures and do not require pest-control efforts.

However, if you see bugs in or around your home and don’t know what they are or what to do, don’t take matters into your own hands with potentially dangerous or unnecessary pesticides: Contact a licensed professional for assistance. Licensees of the Department of Consumer Affairs’ Structural Pest Control Board are trained to help with questions, concerns, and safe and effective pest-control steps to take if needed. To check a professional’s license, visit https://search.dca.ca.gov.

Related Reading: Using Mothballs to Protect Your Sweaters?

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